Freedom and reflection yeomans christopher. Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency by Christopher Yeomans 2019-01-25

Freedom and reflection yeomans christopher Rating: 6,6/10 1393 reviews

Yeomans, Christopher. Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency.

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

He further helps the reader by providing introductory discussions framing the central issues of each chapter both in terms of the problem of free will and in terms of the development of Hegel's argument to that point in the Logic. The final ch This is a very challenging text. In addition to adding significantly to our understanding of Hegel's theory of agency and recapturing its significance with respect to continuing modern reflection on free will, this study also shows that Hegel's Logic can do some real philosophical work on a specific problem. An authoritative textual content is followed via plentiful details conducive to an realizing of Locke's spiritual idea. Intending to provide a study on Hegel and the logic of agency, Yeomans addresses -- at least -- three big topics. In part, this lack of recognition results from the fact that there has not yet been a study of Hegel's theory of the will that has formulated the problem against the background of the contemporary literature on free will, where basic concerns about the explicability of action loom large.

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Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Age­ncy // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

This is something Hegelians no doubt have noticed many times over, but none have executed the project of e Effing dense book. Determinism implies determination by something antecedent and external to the agent and to whose operation the will is merely passive. Yeomans takes on a number of aims including a interpreting and identifying links between various passages in Hegel's Logic concerning notions of essence, ground, modality, and mechanism among others, b linking notions drawn from the Logic with Hegel's philosophy of action, especially as found in the Philosophy of Right, and c linking a and b with debates in analytic philosophy concerning both i free will and ii the philosophy of action. Hegel scholars may ask whether the relation that Yeomans' strategy presupposes between Hegel's Logic and the other parts of his mature system is compatible with Hegel's own understanding of this relation. He further helps the reader by providing introductory discussions framing the central issues of each chapter both in terms of the problem of free will and in terms of the development of Hegel's argument to that point in the Logic. And thirdly, Yeomans intends to demonstrate that both Hegel's philosophy of action and his 'solution' of the free-will problem cannot be made intelligible without taking into account Hegel's Logic by which Yeomans refers both to the Wissenschaft der Logik and the first part of the Enzyklopedia. In addition to adding significantly to our understanding of Hegel's theory of agency and recapturing its significance with respect to continuing modern reflection on free will, this study also shows that Hegel's Logic can do some real philosophical work on a specific problem.

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Download PDF by Christopher Yeomans: Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

In fact, the problem can easily be shown to recur in the very language used to express why Heg. The final chapter succeeds admirably well in succinctly summarizing these various investigations to offer a Hegelian defense of teleology. By using the continuity between the contemporary concerns and those of Hegel's predecessors particularly Kant , Yeomans shows the necessity of reference to the Logic in order to supplement Hegel's own practical philosophy and the scholarship based on it. He first aims at the heart of Hegel's practical philosophy, which Yeoman rightly identifies as his expressivist and social philosophy of agency. There are many insightful discussions of Hegel's practical philosophy that emphasize the uniqueness of his expressivist and social theory of agency, but few recognize that these two aspects of Hegel's theory of the will are insufficient to avoid the traditional problem of free will. It is divided into four parts, each of which is dominated by a long chapter 2, 4, 7, and 10 respectively.

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Freedom and reflection : Hegel and the logic of agency in SearchWorks catalog

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

I have to admit that I haven't seen clearly how Yeomans combines Hegel's analysis of the relation between causality and teleology with the classical metaphysical problem of free will. There are many insightful discussions of Hegel's practical philosophy that emphasize the uniqueness of his expressivist and social theory of agency, but few recognize that these two aspects of Hegel's theory of the will are insufficient to avoid the traditional problem of free will. As such, only an insider can really hope to penetrate the mysteries of the Hegelian system. This is something Hegelians no doubt have noticed many times over, but none have executed the project of expounding upon that relationship with such depth and breadth. Presenting the reader with frequent use of examples, Yeomans leavens the abstractness of Hegel's presentation and makes the topic accessible to readers new to Hegel as well as those well versed in his work. In fact, the problem can easily be shown to recur in the very language used to express why Hegel's theory is a theory of freedom at all.

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Freedom and Reflection

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

With the exception of 7, which I found surprisingly accessible, these chapters tend to be heavy going, with sections of 2 and 4 bordering on the unintelligible. Ultimately, Yeomans argues that on Hegel's view mechanism, as a general mode of explanation, presupposes teleological modes of explanation, which are more fundamental. In part, this lack of recognition results from the fact that there has not yet been a study of Hegel's theory of the will that has formulated the problem against the background of the contemporary literature on free will, where basic concerns about the explicability of action loom large. Further reflection on this new posit leads to the realization that those conditions themselves are constituted as such only by their relation to our character and thus those evoked responses operating as constituents of, rather than external conditions for, our actions. Second, he claims to make explicit Hegel's answer to the classical metaphysical problem of free will, demonstrating that Hegel's conception is a philosophy of freedom. Much more is needed to fully substantiate Hegel's claims concerning teleology but Yeomans offers a framework for approaching such questions in a much more systematic manner.

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Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Age­ncy // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency. Though Hegel's logical terminology is infamous for its impenetrability, Yeomans interprets Hegel's jargon right into a extra simply understandable vocabulary. The first problem I see is that Yeomans tells two different stories about Hegel's relation to the traditional free will problem. A big part of Yeomans' reading involving show the importance of circumstance in understanding Hegel's teleology view of action, a line of argument that is interesting because of the way that it undermines dualities between between, for example, context and choice, character and will, etc. According to Yeomans, there is for Hegel no way to formulate the opposition between free will willkur and determinism. Though Hegel's logical terminology is notorious for its impenetrability, Yeomans translates Hegel's jargon into a more easily comprehensible vocabulary.

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Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Age­ncy // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

Reviewed by Michael Quante, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster Christopher Yeomans' book is a challenge for the reader in many respects. Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Agency. Hilary Bok, Freedom and Responsibility. So I shall restrict myself to some more general comments addressing what I think are the cornerstones of Yeomans' book. A third main reason for failing to reach the main goal can be that the task set was simply too difficult.

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Freedom and reflection : Hegel and the logic of agency

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

This, too, I leave to the reader to decide. It is one of the great achievements of this book to demonstrate the systematic fruitfulness of Hegel's Logic for our contemporary debates. Thankfully, Yeomans flanks these daunting chapters with shorter summary and transitional chapters that help to give the nonspecialist the impression that he or she is managing to follow the thread, if not the full detail, of the exposition. It is not clear whether he wants to show that Hegel solves the classical metaphysical problem of free will or whether his aim is to show that Hegel dissolves this problem by criticizing the premises needed to establish it in the first place I admit that I am more sympathetic with the latter, therapeutic reading. I may well be wrong about this, and future readers of Freedom and Reflection will better understand the connection the author has had in mind, but my impression was that at this point Yeomans too quickly confounds two different philosophical projects in his reconstruction of Hegel's philosophy of action.

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Freedom and Reflection: Hegel and the Logic of Age­ncy // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

freedom and reflection yeomans christopher

The good news is that Yeomans is clearly an insider, giving every indication of having a deep appreciation and understanding of Hegel's system as expressed in the Greater Logic. This is an excellent study, but suitable mostly for specialists--others beware. In so doing he wants to show that the complex and mostly very abstract reasoning we find in Hegel's Logic can be used to solve specific philosophical problems we deal with today. Naturalists declare that common technology offers a whole account of all different types of lifestyles. In part, this lack of recognition results from the fact that there has not yet been a study of Hegel's theory of the will that has formulated the problem against the background of the contemporary literature on free will, where basic concerns about the explicability of action loom large. To reach these three goals Yeomans not only guides the reader through some of the most difficult passages of Hegel's work but also invokes contemporary debates in the analytic philosophy of free will and Kant's philosophy.

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